Home » Tips & Tools

6 Body Positions That Will Take The Place of Your Tripod

35 Comments

Jeff asks: I hate lugging my tripod around just to get steady shots for the quick stuff. I usually just lean against a wall with my video camera but was wondering if the professionals had more tricks up their sleeve.

Answer: Jeff you came to the right place. Here are 6 little known body positions that will take the place of your tripod (thanks to digital-photography-school.com) These tips apply to video and DSLR cameras and will keep your shot steady and maintain your professional composure without looking like a twisted limb contortionist: (yes we actually encountered a wedding videographer who stabilized his camera between his two knees while standing – believe it!)

1. Keep that shoulder close

I am definitely a right eyed photographer, but this tip that I learned from “The Moment It Clicks” by Joe McNally, requires that I shift for a moment to my left eye. What I’m doing here is raising my left shoulder, and bracing my left elbow into my rib-cage (no arrow for this one). For further stability, you can pull your right elbow in to your chest. As always, exhale completely before depressing the shutter to avoid introducing shake.

Sit the camera on something flat

Possibly the most obvious practice but often the easiest and most reliable approach is to simply sit your camera on a wall, chair, table or anything rigid. The only problem with this approach is that you are limited in how you can orientate your camera; placing it on a chair will mean you can only shoot straight ahead.

Hold Your Breath and pan

Breathing is necessary but sometimes it gets in the way of moving video – if you are trying to be the tripod then you must make yourself as steady as possible. Taking a deep breath and holding it will reduce your natural tendency to sway (very slightly, but enough to ruin a long exposure shot) as the air enters and leaves your lungs.

Avoid The Zoom

If you are using hand held camera techniques try to zoom out as much as you can. The more you are zoomed in the more the shakiness at the edge of the frame will be obvious and distracting to the viewer.

Bring It Into Your Body

If you do not have a strap you can do essentially the same thing by just resting it against your chest. Cup the camera with both hands and prop your elbows against your chest for stability. Try bending your knees just slightly to absorb any shock. If you are going to be doing this for quite a while try raising the camera up to shoulder level and rest your head on the eyepiece.

Lean against something

Often you can put your arms around a pole, if one is available, and lean one shoulder into it, giving you an anchor to steady yourself with. Kneeling is also a simple and effective way to reduce shake – by lowering your centre of gravity you are less prone to wobble.

Use the Machine Gun Hold

This next technique is sometimes referred to as the machine gun hold. I rarely use this technique as I find it awkward and difficult to maintain for more than a second or two. Just because it doesn’t work for me, doesn’t mean it won’t for you. . . give it a try.

Don’t use the LCD screen, use the view finder instead

Although there are arguments for and against using the LCD screen on a camera, for long exposure shots I would say it is definitely a no no. When using the viewfinder you tend to hold your camera away from your body, as much as arms length perhaps. This will simply lead to increased blurring as holding outstretched arms still, even without a camera, is a difficult task. It is better to use the viewfinder and keep the camera in tight to your body – it is much easier to lock your arms steady against your chest.

Wrap the strap around your elbows

What this does is introduce tension in your camera’s strap so the strap is taut, constraining it from moving in at least one direction, relative to your own body. I’ll explain the setup as best I can (I’m assuming you’re right handed and are using a DSLR yes?):

* Hold your camera in front of you, letting the strap hang down.
* Put your right arm through the strap, past the elbow, and bring your hand back out around the outside of the left part of the strap.
* Hold the camera as normal and dig your elbow into the strap.
* Depending on the length of the strap you should be able to increase its tension by tilting your right arm accordingly.

Sit down and Create a Tripod With Your Knee

You can create your own tripod by resting your elbow on your knee while in a seated position. Again, bring that other elbow in for greater support.

Those are just some of the many possible ways to minimise shake that I use. Are there any more you can think of? Do you stabilize your camera in other ways?

35 Comments »

  • Tanvir Singh said:

    Really great explaination!!

  • Bunga Emas said:

    Tqsm for ur guiden advice.

  • Seth Okrah said:

    at least these are the basics

  • Saing Sowichea said:

    Thanks for your sharing. 🙂

  • SuHaIL SaBu said:

    informative tnx man!!

  • Eumesh Weerapura said:

    Thanks man.

  • aninnocentazn said:

    hey man thanks,this is super informative.
    <--- new dslr newbie. Thanks!

  • Stefan Mitic said:

    Its realy informative,i got my Nikon D3200 from my uncle and am starting to
    like to take photograpgies,but cause i have many hunting dogs (English
    setters) when they are in the field i cant take the pictures of them when
    they are abut 200,300m fare a way from me with a 18-105 lense… I`m so
    sead,that i cant afored a bigger lense…

  • kyle cole said:

    hi brian iv been holding the camera like you said and now im taking great
    pics

  • Edgar Allen said:

    gREAT TUTORIAL
    tHANKS

  • Patrick McNease said:

    Very informative article AGAIN !!! Brian thanks for taking the time

  • Hydrokat said:

    My videos are actually done the other way around. Having my elbow up in
    the air is a bit awkward for me. Besides creating fatigue, I also get a bit
    clumsy and give random people a painful hit in the face. It does give the
    bottom hand a bit of a stretch but my hands are flexible enough to do it.

  • Neil Franklin said:

    What is wrong with people these days when they need to be
    shown how to hold a bloody camera right ??? I despair at the quality of
    teaching aid videos currently on the web ..What next I wonder ….”How
    to press the record button properly” ….

  • lorena99755 said:

    I am going to be a student from the art institutes of Utah, so I will need
    your help in photography thanks.

  • Prophit7 said:

    Good advise!

  • Eyka BloodySempra said:

    wow what a clear explanation…!!! thank you very much for every
    information, Brian.

  • FlourescentPotato said:

    Parkinsons medicine.

  • AwakenSoul27 said:

    i got the same momopod….it was only $20 at best buy…i loved it…great
    for video shooting

  • andrey thatsme said:

    what kind of strap do you have? it looks quite comfortable.

  • pkrapp1 said:

    The reason I wrote what I did is because this “method” does not apply to
    all situations. What if you’re using a battery grip? What if you’re on your
    stomach? What if you’re on your back? The issue is stability, not how to
    hold the camera like a pro. There’s no specific way a pro holds a camera,
    other than to ensure they get as much stability as required to ensure they
    get a good shot. Other than that, do what works.

  • loui0008 said:

    love your training, thanks!

  • kfrazier2008 said:

    Great tip! Thanks for posting!

  • iDCL XII said:

    This video helped me out ALOT!

  • salentijnac918 said:

    You are absolutely fantastic. Simple to follow and a clear voice. Thank you
    so much.

  • welderMTL said:

    i close my tripod and tuck it under my arm kind of like im holding a rifle
    and its pretty stable

  • m3RacerBitch said:

    @RvYooK bush did it

  • Zestypanda said:

    We want full episodes!!!

  • ZillaMab said:

    @RvYooK A quote form @TekZila, offical Twitter of TekZilla “@Lufferov due
    to circumstances beyond our control we can’t post full eps to YT. but you
    can always use RSS feeds to get our shows delivered!”

  • Artificialkel said:

    He’s cool 🙂

  • Sam Dunn Photography said:

    why not just get a fly cam

  • paradoxdesigns said:

    Where’s the Asian Squat?

  • VictoryAtGunpoint said:

    This was actually kind of interesting.

  • Cub said:

    Camera mule

  • Shimy said:

    change the title

  • zaki gurashi said:

    good job

Comments or additional questions?
Leave your response here

Add your comment below, or trackback from your own site. You can also subscribe to these comments via RSS.

Be nice. Keep it clean. Stay on topic. No spam.

The dvshow.com is Gravatar-enabled. To put a face to your comments, get your own globally-recognized-avatar at Gravatar.